NYTimes Education highlights

Educators of all levels and stripes should keep up with the NYTimes education page.  While they do not have much on rural education, what do you expect from a paper based in NYC?

There were three recent articles that deal with race and disparities in schooling.

Bussing in Boston:  A powerful example of white flight, Boston city schools are only 13% white, down from 72% in 1967, which was before a judge order to desegregate.  Now they have students who live on the same block who go to different schools.  It’s very difficult to build community support for a school if the community members don’t attend it.  But kids who are happy where they are don’t want to be forced to go elsewhere.  The problem, they say, is that they need more higher quality schools.  My idea: bus some of the private school teachers in to the city! :)

The 30-Million Word Gap and NYC race disparity: I first heard of the 30-Million word gap in a This American Life episode called “Going Big.”  A famous study by Hart and Risely found a huge difference between the number of words kids hear depending on whether or not their parents are working class or wealthy.  NYC uses a standardized test to determine who can go to the best high schools, and despite the city’s assurances that the tests are objective, the number of African-American and Latino students admitted to top high schools is tiny.  Test advocates have been saying the same thing for years, but unbiased scientific instruments they are not.  This article points to the essential unfairness of the tests.

[Wealthy] Parents Pitch in: In Austin, an architect worked to build an outdoor classroom for his kids’ school.  Nice work, if you can get it done for you.  I hope, as does the principal of the lucky school, that it will serve as a model for other schools, not just in Texas, but around the country.  A local architect in Knoxville is working on a similar idea for Pond Gap.

There was one article on the ultimate teaching strategy: Problem Based Learning (PBL).  This is the way education should be done.  Period.  Find the problems that kids are motivated to tackle and guide them towards a related goal.

Technology integration is a pretty key part of PBL when it comes to sharing the results of a project, as you can see in the article.  Another trend in technology is the digital humanities.  This article introduces the idea and briefly discusses some examples.  One is Giza 3d.  Check it out!

And finally a short report on some educational psychology research.  People are constantly putting old news in the news.  Children behave like scientists?  Not a surprise.  Baby Einstein is worthless?  Say it ain’t so.  Children learn through play and experimentation?  We’ve been all over that since I don’t even know when.  Can we credit Rousseau with that idea?  If we narrow our discussion to the history of educational psychology we can say Piaget and Vygotsky both advocated play.

What’s left out of this article is an important idea: as children “behave like scientists,” there’s one thing they are not doing: separating the knowers (themselves) from the known.  Scientists (and the psychologist who wrote the study) constantly project their worldview on to toddlers, but children create meaning through context and connections.  They learn from their world and about it, whereas scientists focus almost exclusively on the latter.  Youngsters are not yet subject to Plato’s cave, Descartes’ mind-body split, or the reductionist bias ubiquitous in our culture.

 

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