ADIOS TEACHERS [creepy robot voice]

Just kidding, but what is happening around the developing world is probably enough to scare the most anxiety-ridden among us.  This article tells how kids in a remote Ethiopian village are teaching themselves how to read and, perhaps more interestingly, how to hack the tablet computers they were given.  (Someone had decided to disable the camera on all of them!)

I first learned of kids teaching themselves how to surf the Internet and speak English after a friend recommended a TED talk by Sugata Mitra.  You can watch the video or read this article, which tells how he got started.

Mitra calls this Minimally Invasive Education (MIE), and as someone who has traveled through some areas in South America and Mexico, think carefully about what Mitra says about the learning he studies: in rural areas, even when there is a school, the teachers aren’t any good.  What does he mean by that?  I personally struggle with the idea of good and bad teachers–it takes a village, you know.  Put one of those good teachers in a bad school and see how well they do.  Put a bad teacher in a good school and see what happens.  But what Mitra is talking about is the style of education given in rural areas.  Often teachers use outdated methods, focusing entirely on rote memorization.  Only the “smart” kids do well.  What MIE allows is access to knowledge, with the only barrier being the skill-set the child develops.

It has to be a radical constructivist’s dream come true: (from the first article linked) Box of tablets dropped off in village.  Kid opens boxes, finds on switch, and within two weeks they were singing ABC songs in English.  Within 5 months they figured out how to enable the disabled camera function.  BAM.  In their study they also find that the kids start teaching their parents English.

[I don’t want to sound like I’m cheerleading for the destruction of non-English cultures.  It is hard to argue with how impressive the results are, but let’s not forget what is lost.  But here’s the thing: change happens, and if we want to preserve cultures, we need to document them.  These days, by the time you finish documenting the culture, it’s already changed.  And you change it by documenting it. There are lots of cans of worms here, so I’ll sign off before opening up three more.]

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